Transcript

Dr. Lindquist:  

Hello, my name is Lee Lindquist, MD, MPH, MBA, and I am chief of geriatrics at Northwestern University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois. Go Cubs!

Lee Tetreault:

And hello. I am Lee Tetreault, senior manager of digital products at Pri-Med. And we are here today for frequently asked questions from the session, Best Practices, geriatric update. Before we begin with these questions, Doctor, would you be able to reiterate a few key pointers from today's session to our audience?

Dr. Lindquist:  

Yeah, I think today's talk, we talked about geriatric updates and things that we're seeing in the literature that need to get out there and need for people to understand. And so some of the things are one, once you see a senior, you only see one senior. Because there's so many intricacies involved with taking care of a senior. And so a lot of the recommendations that are out there for people who are in their 40s, 50s, and 60s, do not automatically fit your patients who are in their 80s, 90s, and 100s. And so that's what we talked about today, how can you help prevent worsening of Alzheimer's, how can you keep your seniors healthy and aging in place as best as possible.

Lee Tetreault:

Great, let's get into some of these frequently asked questions. First, how much exercise should seniors get?

Dr. Lindquist:  

Oh, that's a great question. So I get that question all the time is, "What's the optimal amount of exercise seniors can have or should have?" And what I usually tell my patients is, more. Everybody wants a sweet number of like, "Oh, 15 minutes," or "Oh, 30 minutes." And I always say the more exercise you can do, the better off you'll be. We know that exercise is very good for people, especially as far as keeping them healthy and their brains active, so the more is better.

Lee Tetreault:

What is the right blood pressure for seniors in their 80s, 90s, 100s?

Dr. Lindquist:  

Yeah. So, what is the right blood pressure? And that... It's kinda interesting, it's who you ask. So if you ask one of the cardiologists, they'll always tell you that, "Lower is better." A lot of the results that we've seen from the research only affects people that are in their 60s and 70s. Many times people in their 80s, 90s and 100s get excluded. If you ask a geriatrician, we sometimes will go with the American College of Physicians, the ACP guidelines which is that blood pressures can run into the 140s for older adults who don't have strokes primarily because we see a lot of seniors have orthostatic hypotension, as they get older. What will happen is the minute they stand up or walk across the room, their blood pressure will drop and so will they. So they'll fall and have to be hospitalized with a broken hip. So geriatricians usually, for the most part, are happy with running them a little bit higher than some of the cardiologists would recommend.

Lee Tetreault:

What should you tell patients the best ways are to prevent Alzheimer's from worsening?

Dr. Lindquist:  

So I get that question a bunch, and I'm sure you guys do too is, "How do I keep my memory going? How do I prevent Alzheimer's? How do I prevent Alzheimer's from worsening?" And medicines are not really the answer. There's so many people that say, "Oh, use this medicine," or "Oh, use this medicine or this new herbal product is the answer." But the most research out there shows that exercise and social stimulation are the fountains of youth when it comes to your brain. So the more exercise you can do and the more social stimulation, the better off you'll be.

Lee Tetreault:

And lastly, should seniors adhere to tight diabetic diets as they get older?

Dr. Lindquist:  

Oh, I love my seniors and so, so many of them will be told that they're diabetic at age like, 95 or that their blood sugars are too high. And the newest recommendations have shown that older adults can have higher blood sugars and that they can run into the eights and sometimes the nines depending on what their life expectancy is. So, I tell some of my patients, especially if you're hitting 100, that it's okay to have a piece of pie now and then. So go ahead, eat some pie.

Lee Tetreault:

This is great information, Doctor. Thank you so much for your time today.

Dr. Lindquist:  

Sure. Thank you, Lee.




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