469 - 480 of 7279 results
1 CME CREDIT

Infectious diseases syndromes are common in primary care practices. However, staying current with relevant literature that may influence appropriate evaluation and treatment of patients with these syndromes can be difficult, given the volumes of applicable articles and diversity of journals publishing these reports. This session will present some common infectious disease scenarios and provide crucial literature updates. You will learn about how responding to histories of penicillin allergy may result in adverse patient outcomes, the proper timing of influenza vaccination, the influence of substance abuse on risk medication adherence and infectious diseases risk, the appropriate evaluation of patients with suspected cellulitis syndromes, and the role of preoperative urine screening.


1 CME CREDIT

In this session, you will receive the most important cardiology updates from 2018-2019, including trial evidence for dietary supplements in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and new information about the blood cholesterol guidelines. The session will also provide advice on how to differentiate between opportunistic and systematic screening for atrial fibrillation as well as identify ways to conduct this screening in practice.


1 CME CREDIT

This rapid-fire, case-based presentation will discuss the guidelines, controversies, and complexities of hypertension management.


0.75 CME CREDIT

In the United States, over six million children have asthma and over 130,000 children are hospitalized yearly due to asthma exacerbations. Children with difficult-to-treat and/or severe asthma have the highest morbidity and mortality. In addition to ensuring assessment and management per existing guidelines, there is a need for more precise and personalized approaches to asthma management for these patients. This includes identification of phenotypes and tailoring medication choice based on underlying pathophysiology. This talk will address the fundamentals of identifying difficult-to-treat and severe asthma patients and outline steps to create a comprehensive asthma assessment and management plan.


1 CME CREDIT

Chronic kidney disease is common, yet many clinicians find it intimidating to manage. This session will give you the tools that you need to identify renal disease, recognize which patients are at risk for a decline in renal function, and practice the components of care.


0.5 CME CREDIT

After this session, you will be able to assess risk of medical errors and prevent them in your medical practices.


0.75 CME CREDIT

This lecture will focus on the problem of chronic pain, its burden on the patient, and the societal consequences that result from mismanagement. The faculty will present strategies for pharmacologic (opioid and non-opioid) and nonpharmacologic management of chronic pain and the evidence behind them. With improved insight into controlling and managing opioid therapy as well as medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder, you can help protect your patients from the opioid epidemic. Please note that any data, indications, and guidelines presented in this activity are current as of the recording/release on February 8, 2020, and they are subject to change as new information is published.


0.75 CME CREDIT

When is a nosebleed not a normal nosebleed? How much menstrual bleeding is too much? Hemophilia is the best-known bleeding disorder and perhaps the most severe, but there are other milder diseases like von Willebrand disease that are much more common. What are the common myths and perceptions about children with disorders of coagulation? What does the general pediatrician need to know about bleeding disorders? The speaker will cover the basics of identifying children with abnormal bleeding and managing their conditions effectively.


0.75 CME CREDIT

Primary care health providers play an important role in getting patients to adopt healthy behaviors and make positive lifestyle changes. Learn to apply patient-centric communication strategies such as open-ended questioning, affirmations and reflective listening to get patients to initiate changes.


0.75 CME CREDIT

Research and advancement increase the capability of medicine to provide complex care. Technology can keep patients alive in states that they might not desire. Today, clinicians are responsible for (1) anticipating future care needs and (2) guiding treatments as patients become more ill and less functional. An essential tool in the clinician armamentarium, advance care planning is a skill set that must be honed to ensure that patients receive care both consistent with their informed preferences and appropriate to their prognosis. Advance care planning includes serial discussion with patients about clinical circumstances and prognosis, incorporates specific tools, requires coordination among the team of clinicians caring for a patient across venues of care, and may be facilitated by advance care planning structures. Sometimes the process also requires setting limits and addressing maladaptive coping. Building strong relationships with patients and families, and a consistent focus on goals of care is key to high quality treatment for the complex patient and achieving optimal end of life care.


1 CME CREDIT

e-Cigarettes were 1st introduced to the US market in 2007, essentially to help smokers stop smoking tobacco-based cigarettes. There is some evidence that, for some adults, it may be beneficial to assist with smoking cessation. However, the use of e-Cigarettes and vaping (referred to as ENDS – electronic nicotine delivery systems), has increased significantly, specifically in the US teen population. The FDA and AAP have addressed the concerns surrounding e-Cigarettes and vaping in both regulations and policy statements. Join us as we discuss the latest evidence, potential benefits, and public health concerns regarding e-Cigarettes and vaping.


0.75 CME CREDIT

Controversies around ADHD continue, and higher rates of patients are diagnosed in the U.S., raising concerns about over-diagnosis and treatment. Physicians are often placed in the middle, with the demands of patients for stimulant medications posing a challenge to good care. Conversely, there is more and more evidence for developmentally-based impairments in attention that can respond well to medication. How can we accurately diagnose and treat ADHD with these countervailing forces? A rational, data-based approach is presented including the benefits and side-effects of different approaches, including behavioral strategies. The differential diagnosis is reviewed and cautions around particular "at-risk" populations will be detailed.