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EDDUCATE is a medical education program designed to highlight the unmet need for eosinophil (EOS) testing in the diagnosis and management of EOS-driven diseases. EDDUCATE is intended to (1) increase awareness and understanding of the importance of blood EOS testing on improving diagnosis and phenotyping in severe eosinophilic asthma (SEA); (2) Educate on the role of the EOS as a biomarker in SEA & the prognostic value of EOS biomarkers in SEA; and (3) Understand the risks of oral corticosteroids in the management of patients with SEA, and the importance of referral to a specialist for additional management consideration.


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The Importance of Appropriate Cardiac Testing for Diagnosing and Managing CAD

Industry Webcast Sponsored by Astellas Pharma U.S., Inc.; Not for CME/CE Credit


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Learn more about Jardiance® (empagliflozin) tablets

Click here to watchCopyright © 2022 Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Lilly USA, LLC. All rights reserved. (02/22) EM-US-102145


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A Scientifically Designed Topical Treatment for Toenail Onychomycosis

Industry Webcast Sponsored by Ortho Dermatologics; Not for CME/CE Credit


An Evolving Treatment Paradigm for Chronic Heart Failure in Primary Care

Industry Webcast Sponsored by Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation; Not for CME/CE Credit

This program will review recent developments in the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure and discuss the important role of the primary care physician.


CDC Resource: HIV in the Southern United States

CDC Resources for Health Care Providers

CDC Resources for Health Care Providers


CDC Resource: COVID-19 and HIV

CDC Resources for Health Care Providers

CDC Resources for Health Care Providers


Don’t Make Me Exercise – Give Me Some Tea & a Pill! - Frankly Speaking EP 72

A recent AHA presentation offered data that showed an overwhelming amount of patients would prefer to take a pill or drink tea rather than exercise to lower their BP. This begs the questions: How much does drinking tea lower BP? Does exercise help those with primary HTN or resistant HTN who are already on medication? Finally, how do we get our patients to exercise? Guest: Robert A. Baldor, MD, FAAFP

A recent AHA presentation offered data that patients overwhelming would prefer to take a pill or drink tea, rather than exercise to lower their BP! This begs the question how much does tea drinking lower BP and does exercise help those with primary HTN or resistant HTN who are already on medication and finally, how do we get our patients to exercise!


Goals of Care Discussions in Patients with Serious Illness: Is It a Downer? - Frankly Speaking EP 81

Discussing goals of care with patients that have a serious, life-limiting illness does not affect the patient’s anxiety or depression—but can increase the quality of the communication. Listen to this podcast episode for tips that are easily adaptable to any outpatient or specialty practice. Guest: Jill Terrien PhD, ANP-BC

Discussing goals of care with patients that have a serious, life-limiting illness does not affect the patient’s anxiety or depression—but can increase the quality of the communication. Listen to this podcast episode for tips that are easily adaptable to any outpatient or specialty practice.


Mom, Do I Have to Practice the Piano Again? The Benefit of Music Instruction on Executive Function - Frankly Speaking EP 71

Listen to this week's episode to learn about a randomized trial of children in music vs. visual arts instruction. Music instruction led to improvements in verbal intelligence, executive functions, and academic performance. Guest: Susan Feeney, DNP, FNP-BC

Listen to this week's episode to learn about a randomized trial of children in music vs. visual arts instruction. Music instruction led to improvements in verbal intelligence, executive functions, and academic performance.


Breastfeeding Supplemented with Formula; When Is It the Right Thing to Do? - Frankly Speaking EP 80

Breastfeeding exclusively in the first six months of life is widely recommended. However, in this study of newborns who were losing weight because their mother’s milk had not yet come in, post-breastfeeding supplementation improved weight and did not alter breastfeeding rates at one month. Guest: Susan Feeney, DNP, FNP-BC

Breastfeeding exclusively in the first 6 months of life is widely recommended. However, in this study of newborns who were losing weight because their mother’s milk had not yet come in, post-breastfeeding supplementation improved weight and did not alter breast feeding rates at one month.